Genuine provenance

Provenance has evolved from being an area of interest to consumers, to one of the key markers of quality and trust. People expect brands to be totally transparent about where products are made; the place of production should then demonstrate its role in creating an excellent quality product. As with the Craftsmanship sub-trend, leading brands are also helping individuals to engage directly with the provenance of their products

How is this sub-trend evolving?

How it was

Curiosity about origins and provenance; provenance stories as a marker of premium
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Gaucho only serve Argentinian beef that has been reared on the country’s grasslands and then shipped over chilled, never frozen. Customers are educated with a descriptive overview about the different cuts prior to ordering.

How it is

Provenance a marker of trust as well as quality; desire to engage directly with places where products are made

Provenance.org, the US shopping site and app where you can find items by location, and follow your favourite makers. Click to buy and be transferred to the maker’s website where you complete the sale.

How it will be

A rise in ‘fauxthenticity’ demands that brands have a real story that adds value for the consumer and is told consistently. Coco Vita places the ‘power of the coconut’ at the heart of every new innovation and respects the tropical environments that it is sourced from by making a commitment to supporting and empowering those communities and environments

In-market examples from around the world

What: South Africa’s first bean to bar chocolate manufacturer, using end-to-end controls for driving sustainability and positive social change.
Why: Founded on the principles of social entrepreneurship the company is clear that it is not a charity, but that they take full responsibility for their product, processes, and impact. Their very core is about sourcing the best cocoa and producing the finest possible quality chocolates but without compromising on their core values – a coming together of ingredient and ideology provenance.
What: Umá is a grown-up soft drink that makes every business decision based on understanding of and respect for the fragility of nature – from factories reducing their carbon footprint to use of glass packaging to enable better recyclcing of otherwise waste materials. The brand is proud and vocal about creating a 100% natural product.
Why: The brand recognises that provenance extends beyond origin of ingredients and into every aspect of the business model. As well as their colouring/preservative/additive free range of soft drinks that cater to the under-served non-alcoholic adult market, the brand recognises consumer demand for honesty and so allows people to follow the journey on social media.
What: Stonyfield Organic recently released the Source Map: an interactive map allowing customers to trace the history of the US dairy brand’s ingredients.
Why: Clicking on the map brings up farmer profiles, pictures, and videos detailing how and when each product was produced, connecting consumers with the original source of their food – the people, places and processes behind it.
What: Stonyfield Organic recently released the Source Map: an interactive map allowing customers to trace the history of the US dairy brand’s ingredients.
Why: Clicking on the map brings up farmer profiles, pictures, and videos detailing how and when each product was produced, connecting consumers with the original source of their food – the people, places and processes behind it.
What: McDonald’s recent “Meat of our Regions” campaign put French flavours in the spotlight. Each week McDonald’s unveiled a new burger made with meat from a famous French cow breed. The burgers were paired with local-inspired condiments, from onion sauce to béarnaise, and French Emmental cheese.
Why: This is a great example of a huge global brand reflecting local culture in an authentic way – something very appreciated by French consumers.
What: The TV show “Your own harvest” is a recently launched program by TV3 in Spain that draws on the growing consumer interest in the provenance and origin of food.
Why: The hosts present different locally produced products and explain where the food is produced, processed and delivered to the end consumer. It aims to raise awareness of the local food industry, traditions and gastronomic culture.
What: The Happy Egg Company has centred its reputation on provenance marketing. The entire brand story – from digital media driving awareness, through to packaging – re-emphasises this provenance message.
Why: Consumers are invited to find out more about the British farms in which the hens are reared, they can ‘meet the farmers’ and every aspect of the process is transparent to consumers, making them feel that they are truly integrated into the brand and its mission.